New work! Architectural Collage Art

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My new series featuring Victorian paintings, English Tudor art and Craftsman style art.

Over the years I have created hundreds of portraits of homes and historic buildings, so you can imagine that I have lots of favorites and in many different architectural styles, But three styles really stand out. They are each very distinctive and have stood the test of time.  They are the Victorian style, Tudor style and Craftsman style.

I decided to select some all time favorites within these styles and share their beauty but in a different way. I mixed these architectural art forms with other very different art forms, namely some of my favorite fabric patterns and items that I have collected over time. Many can be found in my home.  Some are from overseas travels, including shawls and clothes. One of the designs is a persian carpet and another is from a brocade cushion. As different as they are, I feel they all integrate well with these architectural works of art.

But I will let you decide and may these be the first of many more.

Victorian style paintings

Victorian Gold - Victorian Era Collage Art by Leisa Collins
Victorian Gold – Victorian Era Collage Art by Leisa Collins
Victorian Rose  - Victorian Era Art by Leisa Collins
Victorian Rose  – Victorian Era Art by Leisa Collins
Victorian lace in the spring – Victorian Collage Art by Leisa Collins

English Tudor style art:

Tudor leather – English Tudor Collage Art by Leisa Collins
Soft hues of Tudor – Tudor Collage Art by Leisa Collins
Tudor elegance on silk – Tudor Collage Art by Leisa Collins

Craftsman style art

Hand woven Craftsman - Craftsman Style Collage Art by Leisa Collins
Hand woven Craftsman – Craftsman Style Collage Art by Leisa Collins
Arts and Crafts Tapestry - Craftsman Era Collage Art by Leisa Collins
Arts and Crafts Tapestry – Craftsman Era Collage Art by Leisa Collins
Craftsman in the winter – Arts and Crafts Collage Art by Leisa Collins

Introduction to Collage Art:

In researching out the beginnings of collage art and found a great article written by Beth Gersh-Nesi in www.thoughtco.com 

In May of 1912 Pablo Picasso glued oilcloth to the surface of “Still Life with Chair Caning”.  That same year, Georges Braque  glued imitation wood-grained wallpaper to his “Fruit Dish and Glass”.  Braque’s work is called papier collé (glued or pasted paper), a specific type of collage.

Collage also appeared in other art movements such as Dada and Surrealism between 1916 through 1923, Hannah Höch (German, 1889–1978) glued bits of photographs from magazines and advertising in such works as “Cut with a Kitchen Knife (1919-20).  Fellow Dadaist Kurt Schwitters (German, 1887–1948) also glued bits of paper he found in newspapers, advertisements, and other discarded matter beginning in 1919.

Many early Surrealists also incorporated collage into their work. The process of assembling objects fit perfectly into the often ironic work of these artists. Among the better examples is the art of one of the few female Surrealists, Eileen Agar. Her piece “Precious Stones” (1936) assembles an antique jewelry catalog page with a cutout of a human figure layered over colorful papers.

All of this work from the first half of the 20th century has inspired new generations of artists and many continue to employ collage in their work.

Collage is also used to add meaning and commentary to art pieces.  This is most often seen in contemporary art. Using magazine and newspaper clippings, photographs and printed words, many artists use these to convey their message. Therefore the possibilities of using collage to address a variety of issues are endless.

I hope you have enjoyed my new work and have found this article informative.

Until next time.

Leisa