Announcing the First of my Industrial Architecture Painting Series

Announcing the First of my Industrial Architecture Painting Series

Historic Perservation, New Art, News
The Rugged Beauty of Industrial Architecture As I travel across the country -- whether through cities or out in the wilderness -- I am becoming increasingly aware of the remnants of America’s industrial architecture and have been inspired by the rugged beauty of their forms.  After all, at the root of this country’s progress over the last two centuries, were the factories built to produce needed goods – from the finest linens to firearms -- for a rapidly growing nation. I have just completed the first three paintings in this series. As you can see, the technique I use is a far cry from the fine detailed pen and watercolors of my signature house portraits, Iconic American Architecture series and more. This first pair of original paintings evolved from various…
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Painting of Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello: Latest in my Iconic American Series

Painting of Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello: Latest in my Iconic American Series

Historic Perservation, New Art, News
Monticello, “Little Mountain,” was home to Thomas Jefferson from 1770 to 1826. It was also the architectural masterpiece of the author of the Declaration of Independence and third president of the United States. Renowned as one of America’s first and finest architects, Thomas Jefferson created, rebuilt, and revised the house throughout his long life.  The home reflects the personality of Jefferson, a Renaissance man and one of the Founding Fathers. [caption id="attachment_29299" align="aligncenter" width="2560"] Painting of Monticello, the latest in my Iconic American Architecture series[/caption] History of Monticello Jefferson began building Monticello in 1769 on the plantation that he inherited from his father.  Located it on top of a hill, the original eight-room main house was still incomplete in the 1780s.  Regardless, the sophistication of Jefferson’s design impressed European visitors. …
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First Paintings of Historic Homes in German Village, Columbus OH

First Paintings of Historic Homes in German Village, Columbus OH

Historic Perservation, House Portraits, News
A trip through Columbus Ohio is never complete for my husband and me until we stop in and visit the charming town of German Village. It a historic neighborhood, situated just south of the city's downtown.  As the name suggests, it was settled by a large number of German immigrants in the early-to-mid-19th century.  At one time these immigrants totaled close to a third of the city's entire population. I am now well into a series of house portraits depicting some of my favorite homes in the area, as part of a series of 50 paintings of homes and historic buildings I have now created within the greater Columbus area. The city of Columbus has a fascinating history, but in this article I am concentrating on the earliest residential area in the…
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Unveiling of “Lost American Architecture: In Memoriam” Series

Unveiling of “Lost American Architecture: In Memoriam” Series

Historic Perservation, New Art, News
Lost but not forgotten architecture I am proud to unveil the first four multi-media pieces in my new collection, “Lost American Architecture: In Memoriam.” As the name suggests, they are depictions of stunningly beautiful buildings that came down long before their time. In each case their fate was sealed by a simple act of unprovoked aggression. They each fell to the ground in a cloud of dust, victims of the deadly wrecking ball. Today they are long forgotten memories, like weathered tombstone inscriptions in a graveyard of architectural destruction that spans a century and more. While nothing can bring these elegant art forms back to life, I created these paintings to honor their intricate craftsmanship and pay tribute to the men and women who designed and built them and those…
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Saving Victorian-Era Carriage Barns and Carriage Houses

Saving Victorian-Era Carriage Barns and Carriage Houses

Historic Perservation, News
The trend to save these delightful relics What is a Carriage Barn? A carriage barn (also called a carriage house) is a building constructed near a larger home to store horse-drawn carriages. They   sometimes housed the coachman or caretaker on the upper floor.  Today there is a growing trend to repurpose these buildings into small second homes, garage apartments or guest houses [caption id="attachment_27940" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Chamberlin Carriage House in Hartford, Connecticut built in 1871[/caption] Carriage House Origins: Carriage houses came about in the era of the horse-drawn carriage in Great Britain.  Owning a horse-drawn carriage in the 1700s was a status symbol for wealthy families and they built carriage houses close to the house along with the necessary gear and operators. Homes that were built in the country…
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Demise of a Victorian Era Masterpiece – the Detroit Old City Hall

Demise of a Victorian Era Masterpiece – the Detroit Old City Hall

Historic Perservation, News
In Memoriam... the first of my Lost American Architecture Series It's hard to fathom that this beautifully crafted Italian Renaissance Revival masterpiece that was built in the Victorian era and took ten years to construct, is now lost forever. Built to last in Amherst sandstone, the Detroit City Hall, in the state of Michigan, was the center of life in Detroit for almost 100 years. In fact I am currently putting the finishing touching on a painting that tells this very story. Paintings of other tragic architectural losses will follow, but this will be the first in my In Memoriam: Lost American Architecture series. The fate of this building that hosted eight presidents (Cleveland, McKinley, Taft, Wilson, Hoover, both Roosevelts and Truman) was sealed in 1961, when it became yet…
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My Tribute to Martin Luther King Jr.

My Tribute to Martin Luther King Jr.

Historic Perservation, New Art, News
The birth home of a truly great American In honor of Martin Luther King Jr Day, I painted this portrait of the Atlanta, Georgia home where the great orator, Nobel Peace Prize winner, and leader of the American civil rights movement was born. I wanted to pay my respect and celebrate his life and legacy the best way I know how — with my paintbrush.   Martin Luther King Jr. (originally named Michael Jr.) was born on the second floor of this clapboard Victorian house on January 15, 1929, and he lived there for the first twelve years of his life. His home was a happy one, and he once said, “I grew up in a family where love was central and where lovely relationships were ever present.” Located on Auburn…
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The Destruction of Historic Architecture

The Destruction of Historic Architecture

Historic Perservation, News
 My defining moment. Why did they tear it down? Every building with history has its own story and precious memories. Those of you who have witnessed the sudden disappearance of a home or building very dear to you, will understand the emotional impact and loss I felt that day. It was a defining moment I will always remember. It was the moment when I realized I had to tell the stories of beautiful historic structures through my art …. before it was too late.  The day started out well. I had traveled back home to New Zealand to see family and also take a nostalgic journey, re-tracing my artistic roots in Auckland, the city I grew up in and where I created my very first paintings of architectural subjects. My…
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Destruction of Stunning South Carolina Mansion

Destruction of Stunning South Carolina Mansion

Historic Perservation, News
Road trip from Florida to Michigan Leaving Florida a few days ago, we continued our road trip heading north, through Kentucky and into South Carolina. This state is one of my favorites, with it’s diverse natural landscapes -- from Table Rock Mountain to the Chattanooga River to vast rolling farmland. Its architecture is equally varied due to early colonial influences, with roots to England. The architecture also reflects the impact that the African Slaves and other immigrants, such as the French Calvanist Huguenots, had on the state. History tells us that before the Civil War, the structures in South Carolina were mostly utilitarian and ornamentation was mostly absent. As towns and cities grew after the war the style trends widened and significant changes were seen in the architecture. Sadly, as…
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On the road again. . .

On the road again. . .

Historic Perservation, News
How do historic homes become abandoned? When circumstances unexpectedly changed last month, my husband Bruce and I had no choice but to leave our beloved home in the delightful historic East Hills neighborhood of Grand Rapids MI.  Rather than face the drudgery of finding a new home right away, we put our belongings in storage (once again) and hit the road.  We headed south for warmer weather, only barely escaping the frigid cold of Michigan that was beginning to creep in. On our road trips we always make it our mission to take off-the-main-road excursions from time to time and we are never disappointed.  Driving down Michigan and then into Ohio, besides enjoying the lovely countryside and the beauty of summer turning into fall, I could not help but notice the ever-growing…
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